Cromford’s heritage

Cromford mill
Cromford mill

Cromford has a population of 1,669.

It is well known because of its connection with Sir Richard Arkwright, who established a water-powered cotton spinning mill there in 1771.

Sir Richard Arkwright and his wife with some of the children wjho are taking part in today's Cromford School Performance of "Lucky Thirteen" which gives a glimpse in to the life and times of the village squire.

Sir Richard Arkwright and his wife with some of the children wjho are taking part in today's Cromford School Performance of "Lucky Thirteen" which gives a glimpse in to the life and times of the village squire.

Some cottages and farm buildings pre-date Arkwright’s time, but a large part of the village was built to house the mill workers. They were provided with shops, pubs, chapels and a school.

The 20th Century saw the development of council and private housing, while the growth of Dene Quarry changed the face of Cromford forever.

Cromford Mill was last in use as a colour works, but is now a visitors’ centre owned and run by the Arkwright Society, with shops and businesses in the old buildings.

Cromford is also on the route of the Derwent Valley Heritage Way, which Belper is also part of.

SP90612 Lizzie Knighton with Guess the name of the bear, for Cromford Toddler group.

SP90612 Lizzie Knighton with Guess the name of the bear, for Cromford Toddler group.