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Your jam jars tree is planted in town gardens

Tree officer Ross Pearson and Sharon Thomas (landscape services) next to the tree which has been installed after the Belper News Jam Jars Appeal.

Tree officer Ross Pearson and Sharon Thomas (landscape services) next to the tree which has been installed after the Belper News Jam Jars Appeal.

The mighty oak tree your pots of pennies helped pay for to mark the Diamond Jubilee has

been planted in Belper’s Memorial Gardens.

At the start of May The News teamed up with Amber Valley Borough Council to launch our jubilee jam jar appeal - asking you to donate your spare coins so we could plant a commemorative tree in the town.

And the campaign went better than we could have ever expected , with your copper collections totalling an impressive £300.

It has helped to pay for a well established oak tree, which was erected by borough council crews on Monday.

A tree was also planted at Crossley Park in Ripley, Heanor Memorial Park and Alfreton Parks after a similar separate Jubilee Jam Jars collection by our sister paper the Ripley & Heanor News.

In December we will arrange a dedication ceremony which members of the public will be welcome to attend.

Communications manager at Amber Valley Borough Council, Luke Barrett, said: “The events of the Diamond Jubilee back in June may seem like a long time ago now - but these trees will remain a lasting tribute to what’s been a very special year.”

News editor Julie Crouch said: “If you donated, or just want to come along to the dedication ceremony you will be more than welcome.

“As soon as we have firm dates we will be sure to let you know.”

Our appeal will get its own Royal seal of approval when it is placed into an official collection of records to be presented to Her Majesty The Queen.

At the end of the project the record will be preserved in the British Library for generations to come as well as being placed before Elizabeth II.

Around 50 jars and bags were collected at the Belper News offices and The News Corner Shop on King Street, which kindly helped out as part of the campaign.

It was decided to plant the tree in the autumn as horticulturalists agree it is the best time of year to bed in a new tree – when the soil is warm after the summer and damp from autumnal rain, giving a young tree a good chance to root.

Our plantings were also more mature trees - giving them a much better chance of survival.

 

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