Rescued swan is spotted safe and well after flock was found stranded

Pictured is one of the whooper swans being rescued near Stoney Middleton after a distressed flock became stranded.
Pictured is one of the whooper swans being rescued near Stoney Middleton after a distressed flock became stranded.

One of the stranded whooper swans which were rescued from a tailings dam near Stoney Middleton has been spotted safe and well with a flock on the Lancashire Coast.

The whooper swans were originally reported stranded and distressed on a tailings dam within the operational land at British Fluorspar near Stoney Middleton in Derbyshire in April, last year.

Pictured are some of the whooper swans which were rescued after they were spotted stranded near Stoney Middleton.

Pictured are some of the whooper swans which were rescued after they were spotted stranded near Stoney Middleton.

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust worked with several organisations including the RSPCA, Yorkshire Swan Rescue and Derbyshire Ornithological Society member Mick Lacey to rescue the swans and transport them to Yorkshire Swan Rescue’s wildlife hospital near York to recover.

And more than a year later, Derbyshire Wildlife Trust received great news last week that one of the adult females - which was colour ringed before being released back into the wild - was seen yesterday with a flock of 47 whooper swans on the Lancashire coast, safe and well.

Tim Birch, Head of Living Landscapes North, said, “This is fantastic news, she has travelled down from Iceland after spending the summer breeding and will now spend the winter in the UK.

“She is clearly fit and healthy and seems to be doing well. A wonderful end to the story.”

Pictured are some of the whooper swans which were rescued after they became stranded near Stoney Middleton.

Pictured are some of the whooper swans which were rescued after they became stranded near Stoney Middleton.

The stranded swans were originally identified by Derbyshire Ornithological Society member Mick Lacey and the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust was alerted by the Derbyshire Ornithological Society on April 12, 2016.

The Trust contacted British Fluorspar and visited the site that evening to find a number of swans had died with a further nine still living on the tailings dam.

The Trust called in help from the RSPCA and Yorkshire Swan Rescue as well as vet Sue Mayer and co-ordinated a rescue in conjunction with British Fluorspar using a boat and canoe to round up the whooper swans.

Seven were carefully herded to the lakeside, checked over, wrapped up in protective blankets and transported to Yorkshire Swan Rescue’s wildlife hospital near York.

Sadly, one of the rescued swans died but the remaining six received treatment for poisoning.

Two of the stranded swans could not be caught initially but the RSPCA returned to catch them and they have were also taken to Yorkshire Swan Rescue.

All the surviving birds were cared for at the Yorkshire Swan Rescue Centre near York with hopes of them making a full recovery.

It is believed that the swans were originally from Iceland, according to the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust.