VIDEO: TV star opens shop revamp

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A star of the BBC’s Cash in the Attic programme cut the ribbon on a major revamp at a Belper Oxfam store at the weekend.

Notty Hornblower - a costume and textiles expert who has also appeared on the Antiques Roadshow, Restoration Roadshow and Channel 4’s Collector’s Lot - visited the King Street shop for a grand re-opening on Saturday.

Notty Hornblower star of BBC's Cash in the Attic is cutting the ribbon after a major re-fit at the Belper Oxfam store. Notty Hornblower and Cheryl Spencer shop manager.

Notty Hornblower star of BBC's Cash in the Attic is cutting the ribbon after a major re-fit at the Belper Oxfam store. Notty Hornblower and Cheryl Spencer shop manager.

Belper born Notty who worked in a hairdressers on King Street as a younger woman, said: “I was quite touched to be invited do this, I used to look after 10 charity shops in the region as a manager so I know a bit about how amazing the volunteers are and what an important role they have.

“You can also find a lot of vintage costumes in charity shops and they have made a big effort at the Belper store to do a vintage range, just as Oxfam’s stores do in London.”

Mrs Hornblower visited the store after it was chosen for the latest wave of store makeovers by bosses at the charity.

The former Belper School pupil has been collecting vintage costumes and textiles since 1976 and established her own local costume museum in 1997. She has given talks and presented her vintage fashion shows throughout the surrounding counties since the late seventies.

In the 1990’s she spent four years gaining experience at Pickford House Museum in Derby. She is a member of The Costume Society and the East Midlands Museum Service.

Her collection covers costume and accessories from 1770 up to the 1970’s and now amounts to more than 1,000 items.

Now living in Alstonefield, she regularly takes students from local universities and colleges for work experience. Conservation work on the garments is carried out by both volunteers and students.

Oxfam launched its own online vintage charity shop at the beginning of 2011. It is also the only major charity to operate its own textile sorting facility

Mal Harradine, of Belper Oxfam, said: “We are only one of a few shops that have been lucky enough to secure a refit, with the old shop that has been a part of Belper for many years, being completely revamped.

“We have some fantastic stock, kindly donated by customers in the Belper area, including ladies and menswear, childrens clothes, toys, bric-a-brac, collectables, jewelry and accessores galore. All now displayed on new purpose-built fixtures in spacious surroundings.”

Oxfam shops convert donations into cash to fund the charity’s work fighting poverty around the world.