Rural policing team hold training summit in Shottle

PCC Hardyal Dhindsa thanked Bill and Jean Dilks for hosting officers and policing partners at Holly House Farm.
PCC Hardyal Dhindsa thanked Bill and Jean Dilks for hosting officers and policing partners at Holly House Farm.

Derbyshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner joined some of the force’s officers in a special training day in Shottle in an effort to beef up rural policing.

Commissioner Hardyal Dhindsa attended the session at Holly House Farm in Shottle along with 12 frontline rural officers to hear presentations on how to handle issues such as livestock, machinery theft and wildlife crime.

Mr Dhindsa said: “Rural crime has a serious financial and emotional impact on businesses and residents and threatens livelihoods, which ultimately damages the rural economy.

“To increase confidence among our communities, we need to increase trust in the experience and expertise of our officers to deal with these problems.”

He added: “I know from the positive feedback we received how much the officers appreciated the opportunity to meet the farmers and hear their first-hand experiences of rural crime issues.

Among the speakers was Andrew Critchlow, the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) representative for Derbyshire, and Detective Constable Chris Piggott of the National Vehicle Crime Intelligence Service.

DC Piggot updated officers on the national picture and trends regarding 4x4, quad bike and tool theft from rural properties.

Mr Dhindsa said: “Robust intelligence systems are vital for protecting rural communities but we also need to be sharing our resources and expertise with our partners to prevent rural crime and deliver a better response to those who live in the countryside.”

The programme also featured information on the purpose of auction markets and livestock theft, fly grazing, fly tipping, stone wall theft, badger baiting and hare coursing.