`

Slump in number of same-sex marriages in Derbyshire

Civil partnership. Photo by Pixabay.
Civil partnership. Photo by Pixabay.

The number of couples forming civil partnerships in Derbyshire has fallen dramatically since same-sex marriage was legalised, ONS figures show.

In the four years before the Same-Sex Marriage Act came into force in March 2014, there were 244 civil partnerships formed in the area

From 2014 to 2017, that number fell to 31. Of the 31 civil partnerships formed during that time, 16 were male couples and 15 were female couples.

Civil partnerships have fallen out of favour across the whole of England and Wales. Almost 24,000 couples entered civil partnerships between 2010-13, falling to just over 4,000 in the following four years.

A civil partnership is a legally recognised relationship which guarantees same-sex couples the same rights as married couples.

LGBT charity Stonewall has said that despite its dwindling popularity, the civil partnership is still an important institution and shouldn’t be abolished.

Stonewall campaigns, policy and research director Paul Twocock said: “The introduction of civil partnerships in 2005 was a huge milestone for LGBT equality.

“For the first time, same-sex couples could have their relationships legally recognised and secure the same benefits as married couples of different sexes.”

“Many thousands of same-sex couples have also decided not to convert their civil partnership into a marriage,” he added.